Table of Contents

Carillon Beach Design Code

CB
DRB

Carillon Beach
Design Review Board

TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION

Carillon Beach is being built in accordance with a master plan and concept for beach living that is markedly different than that typically imposed on Florida's coast.

Its streets are laid out forthrightly, with direction and purpose; they do not wind endlessly but terminate in vistas that constantly orient the driver or pedestrian as well as adding to the beauty of the community.

Its beaches are easily accessible, both physically, by access easements for foot travel, and visually, through view corridors between houses.

Hospitable at all times to pedestrians, Carillon Beach is intended ultimately to include shops, restaurants and meeting areas within easy walking distance of residential areas.

By accommodating two dwelling units on most lots, Carillon Beach allows the homeowner to construct a guest house or smaller unit which can be used by other relatives, guests, a nanny, or tenants.

Its architecture is not tied to a particular period or place in history. Instead, it respects the climate, geography, time and culture in which it is built—the heat and humidity of summer, as well as the occasional freezes of winter. Shaded porches capture gulf breezes while contributing to neighborly conversation. High ceilinged rooms are airy and full of light.

Carillon Beach will be built by hundreds of different homeowners, architects, and builders. Each of these individuals will contribute to the shaping of the final community.

The Carillon Beach Design Code communicates the elements which are essential for creating this community. It is a living document which is constantly changing as conditions warrant. Its purpose is to create a finished community in which man can live in harmony with the coastal environment. Additionally, it is the intent of this Code to create an urban fabric where houses are both diverse, reflecting the taste of their owners, while at the same time blending together to create a unified whole. Within these essential elements, there is room for creative and individual design which vitalizes the community.

Compliance with the Code is essential to maintain the integrity of the community. The adherence to these aesthetic values has and continues to play a significant role in attracting its owners to become a part of Carillon Beach. Therefore, the Code must be enforced, and compliance to the Design process is mandatory. Additionally, adherence to the Code is essential to the hope of preservation and the potential appreciation of our property values.

Prior to submission of plans to the Design Review Board, it is required that the owner schedule and attend a meeting with the Architect and the Town Planner, to discuss the site, the approval process and the spirit of the Design Code. It is imperative that the Architect have a clear understanding of the Design Code in order to prevent unnecessary modifications and revisions to the plans.

The following are definitions of some terms which are used throughout the Code:

  • A building envelope is the area of the lot on which the house, outbuilding or garden structure can be located. It is the area within the front, rear and side setbacks of the lot.
  • A dwelling unit is a residential unit complete with sleeping, cooking and bathing facilities with a private entrance.
  • A footprint of a building is the area covered by the structure at the ground level other than conventional roof overhangs, uncovered steps and uncovered outdoor showers.
  • A garden structure is a carport, pavilion, gazebo, pergola, deck, arbor or similar structure. An arch, trellis or similar structure located at the fence gate or driveway is not considered a garden structure for purposes of the setback requirement. These structures cannot have walls.
  • A home industry which does not generate significant traffic may be permitted under the Carillon Beach Design Code. Any owner that desires to operate such a business must submit their proposal in writing to the Design Review Board, together with any applicable fees.
  • An outbuilding is an enclosed structure, one or two stories in height, which is secondary to and detached from the main building on the lot. A typical outbuilding would be a guest cottage, a garage, or a garage with garage apartment.
  • An overhead connector is a walk, deck or similar structure that connects the house with an outbuilding or garden structure at any level other than the first floor.
  • The term Conditioned Space represents heated and cooled space.
  • The terms Hot Tub and Spa are used interchangeably.
  • The Community Planner is a designated member of the Design Review Board.
  • The term Contractor means a General Licensed Contractor in the State of Florida.
  • The term Architect means an Architect Licensed in the State of Florida.

PART I: DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

ARTICLE I: SETBACKS

Uniform setbacks establish the character of the street, whether intimate or grand. In some areas, setbacks are designed to provide corridors.

Setbacks are established on a street by street basis and are shown graphically in Exhibit C of the Design Code. These are known as the standard setbacks.

To establish the streetscape, the standard front setbacks are both a minimum and a maximum. The front of the main building must be situated on the front setback line, except for gulf-front lots which are discussed separately in Part II: Neighborhood Codes. Main buildings on corner lots must be situated on the front setback line of both streets.

Garage doors which face the street must be located a minimum of 50 feet from the front property line, if possible. If the site dimensions do not allow this, then the garage must be positioned at the rear setback of the lot.

Interior lot garbage enclosures will be located at the rear of the house on the driveway side. All locations will be reviewed by the Design Review Board for minimal impact on the adjoining properties and for ease of pick up (See sections 6.6 and 6.7).

ARTICLE II: LOT COVERAGE, PARKING AND DRAINAGE

Lot coverage standards assure proper storm water retention and prevent visual crowding. Sufficient parking areas are necessary to avoid overloading the streets, but impervious driveways and parking areas must be limited as they can prevent absorption of storm water.

For single-story homes, the footprint of the main house cannot exceed 42% of the lot area; maximum heated and cooled area is 30% of the lot area.

In all cases, the total footprint for the main house, any outbuilding and any roofed garden structure is not to exceed 42% of the lot area. See Exhibits B-1 through B-11 for calculations.

The square footage of the main house and the outbuilding is not cumulative; that is, the square footage of the main house cannot be increased beyond that permitted, even if there is no outbuilding. See Exhibits B-1 through B-11 for calculations.

The total impervious area is not to exceed 60% of the lot area. No rain water shall discharge onto adjacent properties. See Exhibit B1 through B-11 for calculations.

Where a residential lot faces a circle or intersection, the driveway must open to the adjoining roadway rather than to the circle or intersection whenever possible.

The driveway may be constructed of pavers, crushed stone or unstamped concrete. If concrete is utilized, it must be accented in an aesthetically pleasing manner with pavers. To accomplish this, the driveway must be bordered with pavers and the pavers must be a minimum of 10% of the interior portion of the driveway. All driveway surfaces must be adequately stabilized. Modifications or repairs shall be submitted to the Design Review Board.

French drains are required on every driveway at the property line to help control storm water run-off and erosion. See Exhibit C.

ARTICLE III: BUILDING STRUCTURE

Off-grade construction and non-continuous footing walls welcome natural breezes, allow the house to "breathe" and provide an area to capture rain water

Large, covered porches which shade the house from the heat of direct sun and provide outdoor living space, contribute to the streetscape ,while small towers reach for the sky, often allowing a glimpse of the gulf even from inland streets. Inside, 10 foot ceiling heights contribute to the airy feeling and help ventilate the house.

Gulf front houses in Carillon Beach have special foundation requirements based on the criteria of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). These situations will be reviewed on a case by case basis.

All piling construction shall be augured or jetted with final tamping allowed to obtain the proper penetration and bearing capacity as required by the engineer.

Once the foundation or pilings have been put in, construction must be continuous.

The peak of the roof for all two-story residential buildings north of Sea Hill and on Carillon Circle may extend to 35 feet.

For single-story residential buildings, the peak of the roof shall not exceed 20 feet. The peak of the roof for residential buildings on gulf-front lots shall not extend more than 35 feet above the crest of the primary dune or 55 feet above sea level, whichever is less.

The above heights do not include chimneys, roof finials, other similar projections, and towers (where permitted; see Section 3.4) which may extend above the roof peak. Chimneys must meet, but shall not exceed the minimum height required by all applicable Codes.

Table of Building Height

Note: See 3.4 “Towers” below for exceptions for Blocks M, S and W

Additionally, a 24 inch crawl space must be maintained between the finished grade underneath the house and the bottom side of floor joists, this may be accomplished by excavating under the house, which will also allow for storm water collection and percolation . The 24 inch crawl space must have acceptable crawl space accesses, both size and location. The entire crawl space must be free and clean of any garbage or debris.

All residential structures shall have a dimension of at least 10 feet, 6 inches from the finished first floor to the finished second floor. Ceiling heights of at least 10 feet are encouraged throughout the community.

Non gulf-front residential structures shall not exceed two levels excluding space constructed within the roof structure and allowable towers. Except as permitted in Part II; Neighborhood Codes.

Gulf-front residential structures shall not exceed 3 levels, which include any level finished or unfinished at or below grade.

Maximum enclosed area 200 square feet
Maximum area including porches and balconies 250 square feet
Maximum exterior dimension including porches and balconies:
... if parallel to coast 16 feet
... if perpendicular to coast 18 feet
Maximum height (roof peak) above crown of road
... Lots South of Seahill Ave 40 feet
... Lots North of Seahill Ave 45 feet

For lots in Block M, S, W, and Z, please see Part II: Neighborhood Codes, Article IV: Block W. Towers will be subject to particular scrutiny as to height, location and their relationship to the architecture of the house. Towers cannot be located directly on the street and, except for comer lots, must be at least 20 feet from the front of the house including the front porch. Tower decks may not be screened.

All roofs of a structure shall have the same pitch, except in the case of a broken roof pitch which is allowed over a porch or when used around the entire perimeter of the roof. Roof pitch over a porch may be no less than 3 inches in 12 inches.

  1. If a house has one porch on the front elevation, the porch shall be at least 8 feet deep by 12 feet wide.
  2. If a house has two functional porches on the front elevation, the porches shall be at least 8 feet deep with a cumulative width of at least 18 feet.
  3. On corner lots, porches must face both streets with each porch having a minimum depth of 8 feet and a minimum width of 12 feet.

Porches on two levels, with one above the other, known in the Code as double-loaded porches, are encouraged.

In addition to the front porch requirement, all houses on gulf-front or lake-front lots shall have porches or attached decks on the water side of the house with a minimum area of 120 square feet.

All porches must have a minimum depth of 8 feet, although smaller porches will be permitted once a house achieves its minimum porch requirement.

Larger porches are encouraged in lieu of conditioned square footage as long as the total allowed building footprint is not exceeded.

Additional information concerning porches is contained in Part II, the Neighborhood Codes.

One outbuilding per lot is allowed. Uncovered exterior stairs are permitted but cannot front on streets. Overhead connectors between the primary structure and the outbuilding are prohibited.

The minimum ground floor elevation for living areas is 1 foot 6 inches above grade and is at grade for garages. The maximum height to the roof peak is 27 feet above grade.

An outbuilding may be constructed before or in lieu of the primary structure, if the owner (a) fully landscapes the lot, (b) erects the required fences and (c) constructs a pavilion, deck or arbor with minimum dimensions of 12 feet by 8 feet by 9 feet high. The pavilion, deck or arbor must be located on the front setback line and must address the street or streets. On corner lots the structure is required to have minimum dimensions of 12 feet wide, 8 feet deep and 9 feet tall as it addresses each street.

All garden structures used in this manner must be enclosed by a railing and be built at least 18 inches, but no more than 24 inches, above grade. This structure serves as a sitting porch that addresses the street in a pedestrian friendly manner.

For additional information concerning outbuildings on Carillon Avenue, see Part II, Article II.

(See Part II: Neighborhood Codes for Gulf Front, Blocks M, S, W, and Z for exceptions).

ARTICLE IV: FINISH MATERIALS AND TRIM

The coastal environment, including salt and sun, must be taken into consideration when specifying any exterior material. This environment, while very pleasing to man, can be very harsh on materials. The summer sun is intense, the salt spray is corrosive, the gulf breezes can turn into strong winds and the high humidity is constantly attacking the structure. The Code is calling attention to these conditions as well as assisting the homeowner in coping with them.

  1. Wood: Horizontally applied clapboard (weather-board), ship-lapped siding, wooden shingles and board and batten siding is allowed. Tongue and groove boards are permitted only on walls under the porch roof. Diagonal siding and plywood are not permitted. Wooden siding on chimneys is not allowed.
  2. Stucco over Wood Frame or Stucco-Clad Masonry: A sample of the proposed finish must be submitted to the Design Review Board for approval. Smooth lime/cement stucco with sand finish is required. Textured patterns or swirl patterns are prohibited. Synthetic stucco is not allowed. Stucco directly over wooden framing substrate is not allowed.
  3. Except for supporting piers and chimneys, the use of brick masonry or brick veneer cannot be visually evident as an exterior finish and if used as an exterior material must be fully Stucco-Clad. If used for piers or chimneys it must be finished with lime based slurry or stucco.
  4. Smooth or Wood grain Cement-Based Siding (including Shake Siding): A sample of all proposed finishes must be submitted to the Design Review Board for approval. When using cement based siding, the Design Code encourages the use of a product such as Hardi's Artisan which is thicker material and, in turn, gives a more realistic appearance of traditional wooden siding, providing deeper overlaps and more significant shadow lines. Textured sidings (other than "high quality" wood grain texture) are not approved materials. Cement-Based siding on chimneys is not allowed.
  5. Fasteners and nails: All fasteners and nails used on the exterior of houses, garden structures and fences shall be stainless steel.
  6. Metal: Any materials used on the exterior of any structure shall be stainless steel, brushed chrome or aluminum due to the corrosive nature of the environment.
  7. Exterior spray painting is not allowed

All exterior colors must be submitted to the Design Review Board for prior approval and should include manufacturer's name, type, number and a paint chip. When stucco is to be used, a sample (at least 6" x 6") of the proposed finish and color must be submitted for approval.

As stated in Part I, Article IV, Section 4.1, spray painting is not allowed in any event on the exterior of the house or any structure.

Doors must be impact rated. Manufacturer’s data and style shall be submitted to the Design Review Board for approval of profile, material and architectural merit.

When doors are divided into lights, they must have either true divided lights or muntins applied to both sides of the glass. Highly reflective mirror glass, or color tinted glass is not permitted. Low E glass is allowed and encouraged for energy efficiency

Sliding glass doors shall not be permitted in any facade facing a street.

On gulf-front houses, all doors must comply with the provisions for protection of sea turtles contained in Exhibit F

All metal roofs must be white or natural non-corrosive metal finish with protective coating. All other colors must be submitted for approval. The entire roof must be of the same color and value

Asphalt, fiberglass, composition, slate, and wooden shake shingles are prohibited

Gutters with downspouts are required on all buildings. Gutters must be complimentary of the roof material and of non-corrosive metal. Downspouts are not permitted on primary, street facing facades of the house or porch. Downspouts shall direct storm water to the retention area beneath the home or to an approved engineered drainage system beneath grade within the property

Rain chains are allowed in lieu of downspouts, as long as the water is collected and then directed beneath the home to the retention area or to an approved, engineered drainage system. When a building is re-roofed, gutters and down spouts are required.

Metal awnings are not permitted.

If lattice is used, it must be privacy grade with spacing between lattice no greater than the width of the lattice. Lattice panels must be secured within a frame that has a minimum width of 3.5 inches.

ARTICLE V: UTILITES AND LIGHTING

The containers and equipment which support daily life in the twenty-first century must be handled tastefully so as to minimize their impact on the neighbors and community. Additionally, soft lighting at night serves to guide the way of pedestrian s as well as presenting the property in a pleasing nocturnal manner.

All exterior lighting must be approved by the Design Review Board. All entry gates (whether facing the street or pathways) and all property corners facing all pathways are required to be lit at night with acceptable low-voltage or low wattage landscape lighting. Landscape lighting shall use low voltage or wattage and shall be located as close to grade as practical. All wiring must be placed underground.

ARTICLE VI: FENCES AND OTHER YARD STRUCTURES

Fences serve as a very important role as they define the public and private space. Gateways provide access to the private space to the invitees.

Individual mailboxes clutter all otherwise- pleasant streetscapes and are not allowed. Mailboxes located in a central area allow an additional opportunity for neighbor to meet neighbor.

Pedestrian gateways shall be provided in fences abutting streets and footpaths. Gateways shall have an operable gate with the same design characteristics as the fence.

Fences shall be between 3 feet and 3 feet 6 inches in height. Four types of fences are permitted:

Type I Wood with a transparency factor between 25% and 50%
Type II Metal picket or wrought iron
Type III A combination of masonry with a smooth, .stucco finish and wood as described in Type I
Type IV A combination of masonry with a smooth stucco finish and metal pickets or wrought iron as described in Type II

Fence patterns, pilaster designs and corner posts must be approved by the Design Review Board. Chain link fences are prohibited.

All wood on fences must be painted white. Any other color than white on metal or masonry with stucco must be approved by the Design Review Board. Fences are required along walking trails and shall be wood picket type with a transparency factor between 25% and 50%.

Pool fences, gates, and security latches must meet the applicable governmental regulations. See Section 6.4

During the construction period, construction signs with a cumulative area of 15 square feet which identify the contractor, architect and lender may be placed on the lot. Construction signs are subject to Design Review Board approval and must be removed at the end of construction

Except for certain rights reserved to the developer for marketing of the project, no other signs are permitted at any time.

For additional information regarding garden structures and outbuildings, see Part I, Section 3.7

The pool or hot tub, including coping, may not extend beyond the 5 foot setback of the property line. When pools and hot tubs are located at the 5 foot setback of an adjoining lot, 3 feet is required to be maintained as a green space. Buffering type landscaping may be required by the Board and must be submitted for approval.

The pool size is limited to a maximum size of 120 square feet and hot tubs and spas are limited to 80 square feet.

The pool deck area should be limited to minimize the impervious areas on the lot. It is the intention of the Board to maintain green spaces between the main house and outbuildings. Pool areas and courtyards will require a “detailed landscape plan” from a licensed landscape planner and subject to review by the Design Review Board.

Pool fencing should meet the requirements of Design Code Section 6.1 Fences. The pool and fencing must comply with the regulations of all governmental agencies. Along all pedestrian pathways, a wood picket fence (Type I) shall be maintained. Solid stucco wall enclosures may be used for privacy, but not along the community pedestrian pathways.

When designing the pool and pool deck areas, the owner should give courteous consideration of the visual and sound effects upon the adjoining property owner.

For Lakeside Lots: In addition, the door of the shed may not face the lake, and the lakeside elevation must be aesthetically pleasing.

ARTICLE VII: LANDSCAPING AND SITE IMPROVEMENT

Carillon Beach has a diversity of vegetation, including scrub vegetation with unique flora, oak and pine clusters, occasional magnolias and marshy wetlands. It is the intent of the Design Code to retain the natural features of the landscape as much as possible, and to create a harmonious relationship between the natural environment and the man-made environment.

The architect designing the residence is responsible for the submittal of the landscaping plans to the Design Review Board. The general contractor shall be responsible for the installation of the landscaping.

Any fill brought into Carillon Beach must be white beach sand, approved by the Design Review Board.

With the exception of hand trimming weeds, vines, or underbrush, no vegetation shall be removed or destroyed on any lot prior to Design Review Board approval of the landscape plans and specifications.

The clearing and removal of vegetation in anticipation of construction is not permitted prior to a recorded Bay County Notice of Commencement for the construction of a house.

  • The turf must be of highest quality with a pile at least 1 ½” long and density at least 50oz/yd
  • It must be natural green so as to emulate grass
  • It must not be visible from the street or sidewalk
  • It must be buffered by a natural landscape
  • It must be installed by an approved, vetted, experienced and competent installer – per manufacture’s recommendation
  • Note: See Synthetic Turf Council “Considerations When Buying Synthetic Grass”

ARTICLE I: GULF-FR0NT

The gulf-front lots offer challenging and exciting possibilities. While the center of family activity will be at the gulf- front portion of the main house, the streetscape, the village, and pedestrian passers-by cannot be ignored. The provisions of this Article allow the gulf front lots to address the street in an architecturally pleasing manner.

  1. An outbuilding with living area at the ground level which must be located on the front setback line.
  2. A garden structure, other than a carport, must be located on the front setback line. The garden structure must be at least 12 feet wide as it addresses the street, 8 feet deep and 9 feet high. It must be enclosed by a railing and be built at least 18 inches, but no more than 24 inches, above- grade. This structure serves as a sitting porch that addresses the street in a pedestrian-friendly manner.
  3. An outbuilding with a garage on the ground level and living area on the second level must be located at least 20 feet but not more than 25 feet from the front property line. Where possible no garage door shall face the street. The facade of the building together with the area between the building and the street must be softened and treated in a pedestrian-friendly manner. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways such as porches, trellises, balconies, driveway pavers and landscaping.
  4. The doors of 2 car garages in an outbuilding must not face the street. The elevation of the garage that faces the street must be addressed in a sensitive, pedestrian-friendly manner and the building must be located on the front set back line.

Other solutions may be considered by the Design Review Board.

Uncovered, exterior stairs not to exceed 4 feet in width, are permitted at the rear (southern elevation) of an outbuilding and do not constitute a portion of the footprint.

An outbuilding must be separated from the main house by at least 5 feet. An unenclosed pedestrian connector is permitted only at the ground level and shall not be more than 5 feet wide.

See Special Conditions: Beachside Gardens & East End of Gulf, Part II, Section I.I0.

ARTICLE II: CARILLON AVENUE

Carillon Avenue is the primary street in Carillon Beach and will continue the tradition of the Main Streets and Boulevards of American small towns. The residences addressing it must exhibit this same grandeur.

The front setback is 25 feet and the side setback is 10 feet on one side and 12 feet on the other. Towers shall not be closer than 20 feet from the front of the porch. Outbuildings may not be constructed before or in lieu of the primary structure.

Houses must have front porches across the full width of the house with a minimum depth of 8 feet. If a house has two stories, the porches must be double loaded. The front setback is 15 feet. Towers shall be no closer than 20 feet from the front of the porch.

The front setback is 15 feet on Carillon Avenue and 10 feet on Beachside Drive. However, the side entrance porch can be located 10 feet from Carillon Avenue. A 16 foot driveway cut is allowed on these lots.

ARTICLE III: LAKE FRONT

The Lake at Carillon provides one of the most exciting opportunities to blend the dynamics of the ocean with the tranquility of a coastal lake.

While the center of family activity may be on the lake side, the streetscape and the village cannot be ignored.

Outbuildings must comply with the code for outbuildings on interior lots and must be situated within the building envelope of the lot.

Decks that are located adjacent to the lake cannot exceed 250 square feet of which up to 150 square feet may be covered. The roof cannot serve as a second level deck. The deck cannot be over 18 inches above grade nor over 16 feet wide as it faces the lake. It must be located at least 10 feet from the wetlands line. Piers are not allowed.

An outbuilding on Block C, Lot 11 is not allowed.

ARTICLE IV: BLOCK W

Lots 10 through 16 and 20 through 30 of Block W offer unique building opportunities as they form the end condition of Carillon. Special considerations to architectural merit will be given.

Towers on the main house, including decks and porches, shall not be closer than 20 feet from the front of the main porch. Towers may contain 400 square feet of enclosed area and 200 square feet of decks and/or porches. They may have a height of 50 feet to the peak of the roof.

An outbuilding footprint may not exceed 500 square feet (600 square feet for a building located at the rear of lots 20-30) with an additional 200 square feet of covered porches, decks or balconies. (See definitions) The outbuilding may be three levels with a maximum height of 38 feet.

Outbuildings on lots 11-16 and 20-30 may also include a tower. If a tower is included the following additional requirements apply:

  1. Maximum height for an outbuilding with a tower is 45 feet to the peak of the roof of the tower.
  2. Maximum enclosed area of the tower is 200 square feet.
  3. Maximum area of the tower including porches and balconies is 250 square feet.
  4. Tower porches or balconies may not be screened.
  5. Towers will be scrutinized as to location, including distance from the front of the Building, as well as their relationship to the architecture of the building, and approved on a case by case basis.

ARTICLE V: BLOCK T

Block T offers unique building and use opportunities. Special considerations for its use and architecture will be determined at the time that a program is developed.

ARTICLE VI: BLOCK M

Lots 4 through 8 of Block M offer unique building opportunities as they act as a buffer on the western end of Carillon. Special considerations to architectural merit will be given.

The peak of the roof for all single and two-story residential buildings may extend to 35 feet. (See Part I, Article III, Section 3.2)

Towers on the main house, including decks and porches, shall not be closer than 20 feet from the front of the main porch. Towers may contain 400 square feet of enclosed area and 200 square feet of decks and/or porches. They may have a height of 45 feet to the peak of the roof.

An outbuilding footprint may not exceed 500 square feet with an additional 200 square feet of covered porches, decks or balconies. (See definitions) The outbuilding may be three levels, with a maximum height of 38 feet. Outbuildings may also include a tower. If a tower is included, the following additional requirements apply:

  1. Maximum height for an outbuilding with a tower is 45 feet to the peak of the roof
  2. Maximum enclosed area of the tower is 200 square feet
  3. Maximum area of the tower, including porches and balconies is 250 square feet.
  4. Tower porches or balconies may not be screened
  5. Towers will be scrutinized as to location, including distance from the front of the building, as well as their relationship to the architecture of the building and will he approved individually

These lots are designated for the Cottages of Carillon. Only four house designs are approved and these designs are the only options that may be constructed on these lots. The houses are two-story with a heated and cooled footprint of 811 square feet. These houses shall have double loaded porches facing the promenade. The house designs area shown in Exhibits 1-7. Lots 15, 23 & 26 have special conditions due to existing easements and lot configurations. The Design Review Board shall be contacted regarding any proposed work on these lots prior to the start of design to discuss these conditions.

Block Y, Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 & 14 – See Exhibit G.

These lots allow for 2-3 story residences with a maximum footprint of all structures not exceeding 42% of the total lot area. These houses shall architecturally address the promenade and harmonize with the style of the existing houses in this row. Houses shall have 8'-0" deep, full width, double loaded porches along the promenade. No conditioned space shall be allowed above porches. The 9'-0" promenade setback is both a setback and build-to line. No structure may be built within the 22 '-0" rear setback along Cottage Court, other than the required fences along property lines. A continuous fence is required on both side property lines from the north face of the building to within 18" of the street edge of Cottage Court. No fence section is required if one exists on the adjacent property. A minimum of 3 parking spots is required with one parking spot required for each bedroom, whichever is greater.

ARTICLE VIII: BLOCK S

Block S offers a distinctive experience as is the only property within Carillon Beach that fronts Lake Powell. This, plus primitive vegetation and unique architecture, combine to form a special neighborhood within Carillon Beach. This Article must be read in conjunction with the entire Design Code as it is also applicable to Block S.

The peak of the roof for the main house may extend 42 feet from the center of the lot, or of the crown of the road at the center of the lot. Peak of the roof of houses on lots 4, 5, 6 and 7 may extend to 45 feet. The house shall not exceed 3 levels of finished or unfinished space.

Roof pitch shall not exceed 10” in 12” nor be less than 6” in 12”. The roof of secondary structures and porches may be less so as to distinguish them from the main structure.

The tower roof shall not exceed 45 feet, except the peak of the tower roof on lots 4, 5, 6, and 7 may extend to 50 feet. Towers shall not be closer than 15 feet from the front of the main house and may not exceed 400 square feet plus an additional 200 square feet of porches. Towers on lots 1, 2, and 3 may not exceed 350 square feet plus an additional 200 of porches.

Outbuildings on Lots 4, 5, 6, and 7 must be at the back of the lot and may contain 3 stories with a maximum height of 38 feet. Outbuildings on Lots 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, and 10 shall contain 2 floors and not exceed a height of 33 feet. Outbuildings shall not exceed a total of 500 feet of enclosed space, except outbuildings on Lots 4, 5, 6, and 7 shall not exceed 600 feet. All outbuildings may have an additional 200 feet for porches, decks and balconies.

Covered breezeways may connect the outbuilding and the house, but are limited to one story. They may be screened or glassed. Square footage of the structures is not cumulative.

Garages must be at the rear of the lots and must be designed so as to limit their impact. On Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 they must face Cottage Court and must have a setback of at 18 feet.

A variety of open and closed porches are encouraged, except the front porch shall be one story and not enclosed.

All roofs shall be consistent and shall be 7/8” corrugated pre-finished aluminum. Color shall be light grey (Cityscape). Gutters and downspouts shall be pre-finished aluminum or copper half rounds. Metal chains or their equivalent are permitted for downspouts. (See Part I, Artivle IV, Section 4.6)

Exposed rafter tails are encouraged. Dormers are allowed in habitable space or to conceal unfinished attic space.

Shutters shall be operable, side mounted louvered, or board and batten. Bahama shutters are not permitted.

Classical columns and arches are not permitted as the house is to exude simple and informal elegance.

Color of the siding and trim is off white and accent colors are allowed at windows, doors and shutters.

ARTICLE IX: BLOCK Z

The Z block is a special section of the Carillon Beach Gulf Front Lots, forming the western end of the development. The provisions of this Article address the special conditions granted for the Z block of gulf front lots to address the street in an architecturally pleasing, and traditional neighborhood, sensitive manner. These houses will conform to Part I: Design Considerations of the Design Code unless where specifically addressed by this section.

Careful consideration of the elevations of the outbuilding must also be taken into account because of their visibility from Beachside Drive.

Uncovered, exterior stairs, not to exceed 4 feet in width, are permitted at the rear (southern elevation) of an outbuilding and do not constitute a portion of the footprint.

An outbuilding must be separated from the main house by at least 5 feet. Due to DEP regulations and dune conditions, the outbuilding shall not be connected to the main house structure.


PART III: THE REVIEW PROCESS

The review process is that point in time in which the dreams of the individual germinate into the plans for their home. This creative time is very exciting and meaningful.

The purpose of the review process is to assist the homeowner in this process and to ensure that the dreams of the individual become a reality and that the individual homes blend into the fabric of the whole community.

Compliance with the Code is essential to maintain the integrity of the community. This unique beauty plays a significant role in attracting its owners to become a part of the master plan of Carillon Beach. Therefore, the Code must be enforced and adherence to the Design process is mandatory.

In addition to the requirements of the Design Code, the owner is responsible for making sure that construction conforms to all Federal, State, County, and local codes, ordinances, and regulations.

Architectural design submittals required under the Design Code must be prepared by an approved licensed (by the State of Florida) architect.

Only contractors, who are approved by the Design Review Board, shall be allowed to build within Carillon Beach. Contractors seeking approval must complete a Contractor Application, agree to the Construction Rules and Regulations and post all required contractor deposits.

Applications shall be reviewed for compliance with the version of the Carillon Beach Design Code which is current as of the application review date.

Final design approvals shall expire 2 years from the approval date (See Exhibit J-1). If construction has not begun as stated in Exhibit J-1, the property owner must resubmit for design approval. Resubmission applications for expired approvals must conform with the Carillon Beach Design Code that is current as of the resubmission date and any applicable fees as of the resubmission date.

The Design Review Board assumes no responsibility for issues regarding structural adequacy, safety, soil erosion, soil conditions, or compliance with Federal, State, County, or local codes, ordinances, and regulations. The DRB, the Developer of Carillon Beach and the Association are not liable for any design or construction defects affecting the safety or structural integrity of a building.

  1. Certified topographic and boundary survey in one-foot intervals, showing site features and existing vegetation, and identifying all trees over two-inch caliper measured two feet above natural grade.
  2. Preliminary site plan with north arrow and scale, showing building placement, required setbacks, actual setbacks, structures, walks, drives, patios, fences, gates, pools, existing vegetation to be removed, air­ conditioning compressor screening, schematic drainage, and spot elevations (1/8" scale).
  3. Preliminary grading and landscaping plan (1/8" or 1/4" scale).
  4. Full size preliminary floor plans and roof plan (1/4" scale) with area tabulations for both conditioned and unconditioned spaces for each floor including towers and showing clearly the dimensions and square footages of all rooms and porches (1/4" scale).
  5. Preliminary elevations indicating doors, windows, proposed exterior materials, floor heights and overall building heights (1/4" scale).
  6. Footprint and Impervious Area Calculation Form, which is available from the Design Review Board and includes the following: lot area square footage, maximum footprint allowed for main house, proposed footprint of main house, maximum footprint allowed for outbuilding, proposed footprint of outbuilding, maximum impervious area (60%), proposed impervious area, minimum water retainage and proposed water retainage.
  7. Gulf-front lots: Preliminary dune walkover/deck design and railing details (see Exhibit E).
  8. Architect certification that the submittals meet the Design Code, together with any variances that are requested. Following review of this submission, the Design Review Board will render one of the following decisions:
    1. Approve the submission so that it may proceed to Final Review.
    2. Return the submission to the owner with recommendations for modification.
    3. Disapprove the submission, with an explanation of the reasons for disapproval.

The Design Review Board shall have 21 calendar days during which to review and respond to the submissions for Preliminary review. If the Preliminary Review Submission is returned for modifications, the Design Review Board shall have the discretion to allow the process to proceed to final review providing the modifications are made or to require another Preliminary Review. If the submission is disapproved, another Preliminary Review shall be required and the process shall be repeated.

  1. Site Plan with north arrow and scale, indicating property lines, utilities, easements, required setbacks, actual setbacks, topography, location of temporary fencing for all vegetation to remain (see Part I, Article VII, Section 7.3), location of all proposed structures including house, outbuildings, garage, carport, decks, patios, pools, fences, walks, drives, terracing, mechanical equipment, garbage container storage area, existing grades, proposed grades, spot elevations, contours, finished floor elevations, roof overhangs, and proposed tree removal and site clearing.
  2. Floor Plans drawn at a scale of 1/4 inch = 1 foot.
  3. Exterior Elevations indicating exterior materials, roof pitch, first floor elevations, second floor elevation, and building heights.
  4. Building Sections
  5. Roof Plan
  6. Construction Specifications
  7. Exterior Color Selections with color samples (may also be selected during the construction process).
  8. Exterior Lighting Selections
  9. Landscape Plan indicating existing vegetation to remain (to be fenced temporarily during construction), proposed new vegetation identified by botanical name, common name, size and quantity as well as landscape lighting and irrigation plan.
  10. Gulf-front lots: dune walkover/deck design, specifications and railing detail (see Exhibit E).
  11. Fence Detail

The Design Review Board shall have 30 calendar days during which to review and respond to submissions for final approval. Following review of the Final Review submission, the Design Review Board will render one of the following decisions:

  1. Approve the submission so that the project may proceed to construction.
  2. Return the submission to the owner with recommendations for modifications.
  3. Disapprove the submission with an explanation of the reasons for disapproval.

If the submission is returned with recommendations for modifications or disapproved, another Final Review shall be required and the process repeated.

Proposed revisions or additions to an existing structure are subject to the same review process and submissions as new construction projects. Additional fees may be required to cover the cost of this service.

Building Permit: Prior to applying for a permit from Bay County, Florida is needed to begin construction, the design and construction plans must be approved by the Board. This includes any work on the lot, including clearing, in anticipation of construction. Failure to secure this approval will result in a fine.

Enforcement Fees or Fines: There is a schedule of fees or fines payable to the Design Review Board for the violation of the review or construction process. These will vary according to the severity and repeated nature of the violation. (Other enforcement measures are in place and a schedule of these may be secured at the office of the Design Board.) These fees or fines are payable to the Design Review Board to help cover the expenses of the required enforcement of the construction process. If these fines are not paid within 3 business days from the day of the violation, the construction of the structures will be shut down until payment is received (See Exhibit K).

This will also apply to the enforcement of any other matter which is subject to the approval of the Board.

Notice filed in the records of Bay County, Florida: A notice to the effect that the structure on the lot was not constructed, painted or modified in accordance with the Design Code may be filed against the lot in the records of Bay County. The cost of this filing and any related costs will be accessed against the lot.

Cease Construction: The Design Review Board may require that the construction, or any other process, be discontinued. The process cannot be continued until the requirements of the Code are satisfied. The costs which accompany this action will be accessed against the lot. (Or the architect and contractor - see "Architect" and "Contractor" paragraphs below).

Remediation: The Board may require that the items that violate the Code be reversed so that the structure is in compliance with the Code.

An Architect must be a Licensed Architect in the State of Florida. Architect: The Architect represents the owner (See Part IV following) and is the person that is responsible to the Design Board for the construction process and for all compliance with the requirements of the Code. The architect is the point of interface with the Board and will be held responsible for compliance with the Code. The architect must conduct on-site inspections at least every 30 days and execute the Carillon Beach Architect’s Site Inspection form (See Exhibit H) and is to immediately provide a copy to the Board. At the completion of the project, the architect must certify, in writing, that the project was completed in compliance with the Design Code.

A Contractor must be a Licensed Contractor in the State of Florida. The Contractor is also responsible for compliance with the Design Code and is responsible for compliance with the Contractors Agreement.

Both the Architect and the Contractor share in the responsibility for the compliance with the code and either of them or both of them may be subject to fines, censure, or may be prohibited from engaging in any future activity subject to the Design Code process in Carillon Beach.

While it is the sole responsibility of the owner, his Architect and Contractor to comply with the Design Code, the Design Review Board and the Town Planner will assist in these regards to the best of its ability.

The enforcement of the Code and of the design and construction process is the responsibility of the Board. The Board has no liability in these regards and will exercise its judgment in its complete discretion.

A detailed schedule of the enforcement measures relating to the Design and construction is attached as Exhibit K.


PART IV: CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

The construction process is that point in time when the plans of the individual become reality. The architect and the contractor working together ensure the individual that their home is constructed consistent with the demands of the environment, their dreams, and the interest of the community at large.

The owner must submit a construction commencement date and a construction completion date to the Design Review Board. Requirements for this scheduling may be obtained from the Carillon Beach Office.

Upon commencement of any site work, the construction of all improvements and structures shall be continuous, uninterrupted and without delay until completion.

The architect shall notify the Design Review Board when the project is complete, including all landscaping. Both the contractor and architect shall then submit their individual Affidavits of Final Inspection and Compliance, after which the Design Review Board shall inspect the project for final approval and, upon approval, will issue a Certificate of Occupancy Authorization form.


APPENDIX: GRAPHIC EXHIBITS AND SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION TO THE CARILLON BEACH DESIGN CODE

The attached Exhibits and information are provided to give the owner and the architect more specific guidelines in the design and construction of the home. Their purpose is to expedite the Design and Construction Process thus ensuring the quality of the home and safeguard the environment and the good of the community as a whole.

DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT A »
Exhibit A. Lot Numbers and Setback Details
Exhibit B. Footprint and Impervious Area Details
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT C »
Exhibit C. French Drain Detail
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT D »
Exhibit D. Application for Color Approval
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT E »
Exhibit E. Dune Walkover Detail
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT F »
Exhibit F. Sea Turtles and Artificial Lighting

The wildlife indigenous to Northwest Florida constitutes one of its treasures. Some of this wildlife can co-exist with man very easily. However, much of it must be protected. The sea turtle is endangered and needs our help to ensure its survival.

Florida’s Endangered Sea Turtles Need Our Help

Each summer, Florida’s beaches host the largest gathering of nesting sea turtles in the United States. Female sea turtles emerge from the surf to deposit eggs in sand nests and later, tiny hatchlings struggle from their nests and scramble to the Gulf of Mexico. Nearly all of this activity takes place under the cover of darkness and relies upon a natural light environment too often disrupted by the addition of artificial lighting. For this reason, Carillon Beach has adopted into our Design Code the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) and the Bay County Ordinance guidelines for protection of nesting habitat, nesting females, and hatchling marine turtles from the negative effects of the artificial lighting. These guidelines are designed to inform beach residents and visitors about the adverse effects of beach lighting on sea turtles and offer solutions that will aid in conserving sea turtles that nest on developed beaches.

The Nocturnal Trek of Hatchling Sea Turtles

Fifty to sixty days after eggs are placed in the nest, hatchling sea turtles tear themselves free from their papery eggshells beneath the sand, and, with periodic bouts of trashing, make their way to the surface. At nightfall, as many as 100 hatchlings burst together from the sand and immediately scramble toward the Gulf of Mexico. Moving quickly from nest to sea is critical for the survival of hatchling sea turtles.

The Problem With Lights

On beaches where artificial light is visible, the hatchlings important journey to the sea is disrupted. Hatchlings sea turtles emerging from nests at night are strongly attracted to light sources along the beach. Consequently, hatchlings move toward streetlights, porch lights or interior lighting visible through windows and away from the relative sanctuary of the Gulf. Hatchlings so mislead fail to find their way to the sea, having succumbed to attacks by predators, exhaustion, drying in the morning sun, or strikes by automobiles on nearby parking lots and roads. Quite literally, a single light left on near a sea turtle nesting beach can misdirect and kill hundreds of hatchlings. Cases where hatchlings have been lead to their death into the flames of unattended fires are testimony to the strong attraction hatchlings have for light. Artificial lighting also affects the nesting of female sea turtles. Studies have shown that brightly lit beaches are less frequently used as nesting sites. In addition, females attempting to return to the sea after nesting, like hatchlings, can also be led astray by nearby lighting.

Solutions

Solving the problems created by artificial lighting on sea turtle nesting beaches requires the understanding of citizens within coastal communities. Reducing the effects of beach lighting requires very little inconvenience or compromise to human safety.

Simply put, the most direct and complete way to resolve problems for sea turtles caused by artificial beachfront lighting is to eliminate all artificial sources that emit light visible from the nesting beach. Light, visible from the beach, may include light emitted directly from sources, light reflected by buildings and other objects, light from interior sources shining through windows, and light scattered by sea mist.

Unfortunately, eliminating all beachfront lighting is not always practical. Human safety concerns and the magnitude of some lighting problems require some compromise. The following links are guidelines offered to mitigate human interference with turtle nesting habits while still maintaining a safe habitat for humans.

Sea Turtles are protected under the Bay County Ordinance regarding Sea Turtle Conservation Zone and Lighting.

Sea Turtles are also protected under the Federal Endangered Species Act of 1973.

And, finally, Florida Department of Environmental Protection has laws regarding sea turtles.

Summary

Carillon Beach is dedicated to comply with the spirit and intent as well as the letter of the environmental laws, regulations, and standards. We also incorporate environmental protection and stewardship as an integral part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of our community. We will continue to communicate with you on the environmental issues and conduct periodic self-evaluations.

DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT G »
Exhibit G. Block Y
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT H »
Exhibit H. Architect's Site Inspection Form
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT K »
Exhibit K. Community/Design Compliance Enforcement Fines
Exterior spray painting Shut down site immediately
Unauthorized removal of trees/vegetation in common areas or adjoining property; or, failure to protect natural vegetation outside approved clearing areas for any construction $2,500
Required building permits not posted when work begins $500 to $1,000
Site debris on adjacent property, common area, easement, sidewalk or street $500 to $1,000
Unauthorized burning $1,000
Fire extinguisher missing from job site (only for new construction or major modifications requiring one) $1,000
Failure to prepare for hurricane or tropical storm $1,000
Failure to cease work upon receipt of a Stop Work Order $1,000
No dumpster cover when workers not present (nights and weekends) $1,000
Parking violations by contractor or subcontractor $1,000
Dumpster missing (where required) $500
Dumpster not on building lot or located in site manager approved area $500
No port-a-john (only required for new construction) $500
Port-a-john must face toward construction site $500
Construction document box damaged or missing (new construction) $500
Unauthorized sign $500
Unauthorized exterior finishes (i.e., paint stain, roofing materials or design) $500
Sand fence missing or damaged (only new construction or major modifications require one) $500
Change order not presented for approval when required $500
Failure to notify/obtain approval from DRB before applying for Certificate of Occupancy (CO) (new construction and remodels) $500
Exhibit L. Recommended Licensed Florida Architects, Licensed Florida Contractors and Landscape Architects
DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT M »
Exhibit M. Demolition

Demolition of any main building or other structure shall be subject to Design Review Board approval.

  1. Demolition Defined

    Demolition as used herein shall include the partial and/or complete removal or destruction of any main building or structure or any component thereof on any Lot, regardless of whether the main building or structure will be re-constructed in the same or similar manner.

  2. Review Process

    All Demolition shall be subject to all aspects of the Review Process set forth in Par III of this Code, unless otherwise waived by the Design Review Board.

  3. Basis for Decision

    In addition to compliance with the Carillon Beach Design Code, the Design Review Board shall also consider all proposed safeguards to nearby persons and property, the experience of the contractors performing the work I the area of demolition, adequacy of insurance for those performing the Demolition, and any and all potential impacts on neighboring Lots and the Commons. For any complete Demolition of a main building, the Design Review Board may condition its approval on an appropriate plan to restore the Lot to a neat and orderly condition pending any further construction. For any partial Demolition, a proposal to restore the main building or structure to an acceptable condition shall also be a condition of approval.

  4. Approved Contractors

    All Demolition must be performed by a Florida Licensed General Contractor approved in advance by the Design Review Board. An Owner may not act as its own contractor to perform any Demolition.

DOWNLOAD PDF OF EXHIBIT N »
Exhibit N. Windows

The Design Code previously limited the approved products to wood windows and aluminum-clad wood windows, but advancements in materials and construction have allowed the development of “hybrid” window products that meet the strict aesthetic requirements of Carillon Beach while offering a cost-saving option to owners. The following high end “hybrid”windows are approved and are examples of high end hybrid windows that are approved. These hybrid products include, but are not limited to, vinyl composites (ie. Andersen A-series) and Fiberglass Hybrids (ie. Marvin Elevate Collection, Kolbe Forgent Series, Sierra Pacific H3). All windows must be submitted to the DRB for approval prior to purchase.